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English, Department of

Brown Faculty
39 matches found.

 Anthony Adams
English, Department of
I study the literature, languages, and cultures of the Middle Ages, especially Old and Middle English, Old Norse, and Medieval Latin. I am currently working to understand how artistic representations of violence and trauma served literary and cultural purposes in the early medieval period. I am also interested in the ways that the Middle Ages has served as inspiration for some 20th-century writers, and also work as an editor and translator for Latin, Old English, and Old Norse texts.
 Amanda Anderson
English, Department of
Amanda Anderson's research focuses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and culture, addressing broad questions of intellectual history, disciplinary formation, and the relation of art and politics. She is the author of The Way We Argue Now: A Study in the Cultures of Theory (2006), The Powers of Distance: Cosmopolitanism and the Cultivation of Detachment (2001), and Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture (1993).
 Paul Armstrong
English, Department of
Paul Armstrong's book _How Literature Plays with the Brain: The Neuroscience of Reading and Art_ was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in Fall 2013. In addition to his ongoing research on neuroaesthetics, his work-in-progress includes projects on impressionism, Bloomsbury, and the politics of modernism. He is also preparing a scholarly edition of Henry James's unfinished novel _The Ivory Tower_ for the new Cambridge University Press edition of his collected fiction.
 Timothy Bewes
English, Department of
I have research interests in contemporary British/American fiction, aesthetic theory, poststructuralist and Marxist literary theory, postmodernism and postcolonialism, and the politics and ethics of literary form.
 Mutlu Konuk Blasing
English, Department of
Blasing works on American poetry, poetic theory, and translation. Her publications include The Art of Life (Texas, 1977), American Poetry (Yale, 1987), Politics and Form in Postmodern Poetry (Cambridge, 1995), Lyric Poetry (Princeton, 2007), and articles on Emerson, Whitman, James, Eliot, Pound, O'Hara, Bishop, Merrill, and others. She has translated Nazim Hikmet's work and has published eight books of translations. The latest are Nazim Hikmet: Human Landscapes from My Country and Poems of Nazim Hikmet (Persea, 2002).
 Elizabeth Johnson Bryan
English, Department of
Medieval Studies
Elizabeth Bryan researches medieval Brut Chronicle narratives and their evolving interpretations, medieval and early modern palaeography and codicology, theories of authorship and textual production in manuscript cultures, and Early Middle English vernacularity. She has published Collaborative Meaning in Medieval Scribal Culture: The Otho Laȝamon (Michigan, 1999) and articles on Laȝamon and on historical reception of the Middle English prose Brut.
 Stuart Burrows
English, Department of
My scholarly interests include the nineteenth and twentieth century American novel, the relationship between literature and the visual arts, the history of photography, film, modernism, and rhetoric.
 Radiclani Clytus
English, Department of
American Studies Department
Radiclani Clytus's research and teaching interests include nineteenth- and twentieth-century (African) American literature and visual culture, history of the book, and literary theory.
 Carol Deboer-Langworthy
English, Department of
 Dorothy Denniston
English, Department of
Dorothy Denniston is the author of The Fiction of Paule Marshall: Reconstruction of History, Culture and Gender (University of TN Press, l995), as well as several articles, essays, and book reviews in literary journals. She is a contributing editor to Anthologies and Encyclopedias.
 James Egan
English, Department of
Professor Egan has published Oriental Shadows: The Presence of the East in Early American Literature (2011) and Authorizing Experience: Refigurations of the Body Politic in Seventeenth-Century New England Writing (1999). His other publications include an essay exploring figures of the East in John Smith's travel narratives, as well as one examining the figure of Alexander the Great in Anne Bradstreet's poetry. In addition to these writings, Professor Egan has published on Ebenezer Cooke, 18th-century Transatlantic mercantile poetry, and Benjamin Franklin.
 Jean Feerick
English, Department of
Professor Feerick's first book _Strangers in Blood: Relocating Race in Renaissance Literature_ (Toronto, 2010) reads colonial narratives of degeneration as evidence of shifting racial paradigms in the period. Related research has appeared in such journals as _English Literary Renaissance_ (2002), _Early American Studies_ (2003), and _Renaissance Drama_ (2006). New work on tragicomedy and ecology appears in _South Central Review_ (2009), _EMLS_ (2009), and _Shakespeare Studies_ (2011). Feerick's co-edited volume, _The Indistinct Human in Renaissance Literature_, is just out from Palgrave (2012).
 Stephen Merriam Foley
English, Department of
Comparative Literature, Department of
Stephen Merriam Foley works on European renaissance culture and letters, classical traditions, lyric poetry, religion and literature, literary theory, and aesthetics.
 Olakunle George
English, Department of
Olakunle George has research interests in African literature, Black Atlantic cultural criticism, postcolonial studies, and literary and cultural theory.
 Philip Gould
English, Department of
Philip Gould researches and writes about early American literature and culture, transatlantic theory and history, and antebellum American literature and politics. He has written books on such subjects American historical fiction, antislavery writing in the eighteenth century, and the Loyalist view of the American Revolution
 Catherine Imbriglio
English, Department of
Catherine Imbriglio studies poetry and literary nonfiction.
 Coppélia Kahn
English, Department of
Coppélia Kahn was among the first to introduce the question of gender into Shakespeare studies, in her book Man's Estate: Masculine Identity in Shakespeare (1981) and many articles. She also wrote Roman Shakespeare: Warriors, Wounds, and Women (1997), and co-edited Making A Difference: Feminist Literary Criticism (1985), which was translated into Japanese and Chinese. Her current research concerns race and national identity in 20th c. English and American constructions of Shakespeare.
 Tamar Katz
English, Department of
Tamar Katz has research interests in twentieth-century literature, with a focus on British modernism, urban literature, and gender studies.
 William Keach
English, Department of
William Keach has research interests in 18th- and 19th-century British literature and culture, including Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and other writers in what is still called the "Romantic" tradition, as well as literary theory, historical materialism, and transatlantic literary culture.
 Jacques Khalip
English, Department of
Jacques Khalip writes on and teaches British Romanticism, queer theory, aesthetics, poetry, and critical theory.
 Daniel Kim
English, Department of
Daniel Y. Kim's primary research field is 20th-century U. S. literature with a particular focus on the Asian American and African American traditions, ethnic studies, gender studies, and the Cold War.
 James Kuzner
English, Department of
James Kuzner has research interests in early modern literature and culture, critical theory, cognitive theory, and the histories of selfhood, sexuality, and skepticism. He is the author of Open Subjects: English Renaissance Republicans, Modern Selfhoods, and the Virtue of Vulnerability (Edinburgh University Press, 2011).
 George Landow
English, Department of
George Landow has research interests in 19th-century literature, art, religion, and new media and hypertext theory.
 Kevin McLaughlin
English, Department of
German Studies, Department of
Comparative Literature, Department of
Kevin McLaughlin's research focuses on literature and philosophy in the 19th century. He is the author of two books: Writing in Parts: Imitation and Exchange in 19th-Century Literature (Stanford UP, 1995) and Paperwork: Fiction and Mass Mediacy in the Paper Age (U of Pennsylvania P, 2005). He is also co-translator of Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project (Harvard UP, 1999). A new book, Poetic Force: Poetry after Kant is forthcoming (Stanford UP).
 Rolland Murray
English, Department of
Professor Murray studies the interplay between mass social movements, identity politics, and literary production in 20th-century African American culture.
 Deak Nabers
English, Department of
Deak Nabers studies the interactions between American literary history and the history of American social thought in a variety of its institutional and disciplinary settings--legal, sociological, economic, and military. His first book, Victory of Law, charts the cultural and literary genealogy of the Fourteenth Amendment.
 Melinda Alliker Rabb
English, Department of
Melinda Rabb has research interests in literature and culture of the 'long' eighteenth century, that is, from the time of the English Civil Wars through the career of Jane Austen. Within this broad time-frame, particular interests include satire, secret history, the novel, early modern women's writing, the idea of war and embodiment, material culture, and the history of cognition.
 Richard Rambuss
English, Department of
My principal historical field is sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature and culture. I'm most interested in Milton, Shakespeare, Spenser, and the metaphysical poets (especially Donne, Herbert, and Crashaw); devotional texts and images; and the Baroque. I also works on film and photography. Kubrick is a particular enthusiasm. Questions about gender, sexuality, and desire--particularly male desire--tend to preoccupy me, whether I'm studying movies or Renaissance poetry.
 Jonathan Readey
English, Department of
Nonfiction writing and the research essay; creative nonfiction; journalism; business and technical writing; twentieth-century and contemporary British and British commonwealth literature, especially the novel; Anglophone, World English, and transatlantic literature; postcolonial and colonial literature; Postmodernism and Modernism; creative writing, especially fiction
 Marc Redfield
English, Department of
Comparative Literature, Department of
Marc Redfield studies British, American, French and German literature and literary theory of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries, with a particular focus on romanticism and on the history, philosophy, and politics of post-romantic aesthetics. He has written on the Bildungsroman; on intersections of nationalism, media, and technics; on terrorism and war; and on the history and practice of literary theory, particularly deconstruction.
 Ravit Reichman
English, Department of
Ravit Reichman does research in the 20th-century British novel; law and literature; modernism; literary theory; psychoanalysis; literature and the emotions; narrative and memory; and literary responses to war.
 Ellen Rooney
Modern Culture and Media, Department of
English, Department of
Chair and Professor of Modern Culture and Media and Professor of English, Ellen Rooney studies the novel, literary and cultural theory, and feminist studies.

She authored Seductive Reasoning: Pluralism as the Problematic of Contemporary Literary Theory (1989) and edited the Cambridge Companion to Feminist Literary Theory (2006). Her new book, A Semiprivate Room, examines the "semiprivate" as it works in the classroom, "personal criticism," and the politics of "the personal is the political."
 Geoffrey Russom
English, Department of
Medieval Studies
Geoffrey Russom has research interests in Old English, Middle English, Old Norse, and Old Irish literary cultures; linguistic theory; theory of poetic form; and the concept of 'barbarian' in imperialist writing.
 Vanessa Ryan
English, Department of
Vanessa Ryan has research interests in nineteenth-century British literature and culture, cognitive science and the arts, and theories of knowledge in and outside of the humanities. She is currently serving as Associate Dean of the Graduate School.
 Kate Schapira
English, Department of
 Barbara Herrnstein Smith
English, Department of
Smith's research is largely theoretical and interdisciplinary. Her recent work concerns 20th-century developments in epistemology and cognitive science, intellectual and institutional relations between the sciences and the humanities, and contemporary issues involving science and religion.
 Lawrence Stanley
English, Department of
• Rhetorical theory and its relevance to composition theory and practice
• Narrative theory, particularly in relation to creative nonfiction and fiction
• British Romantics and Modernist fiction
 Michael Stewart
English, Department of
 Elizabeth Taylor
English, Department of
Taylor's research areas include the varieties of creative nonfiction - personal and academic essay, literary journalism, historical narrative, and memoir.

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