ERIC DARLING

The overall goal of my research is to understand the relationship between the biological function of cells and tissues and their micro/nano-scale mechanical properties. Particular attention is given to mesenchymal stem cells and how they can be used for therapeutic applications. My lab investigates mechanical characteristics via atomic force microscopy, a technique that allows high resolution imaging and force measurements. Our recent findings indicate cells exhibit distinct mechanical biomarkers, which can help identify specific cell types within heterogeneous populations (i.e. metastatic cancer cells, stem cells).

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Biography

Eric Darling is an Assistant Professor of Medical Science in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology with courtesy appointments in the Department of Orthopaedics and the School of Engineering. He received a B.S. in Engineering from Harvey Mudd College, a Ph.D. in Bioengineering from Rice University, and post-doctoral training at Duke University. As a member of the Center for Biomedical Engineering, the goal of Professor Darling's research is to understand the relationship between the biological function of cells and tissues and their micro/nano-scale mechanical properties, with special focus on stem cells. Professor Darling's long-term objective is to use quantitative assessment of the mechanical and biological characteristics of single cells to improve tissue regeneration and cell-based therapies.

Curricum Vitae

Download Eric Darling's Curriculum Vitae in PDF Format

ERIC DARLING, Ph.D., Rice University
Assistant Professor of Medical Science
Bio Med Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology & Biotechnology
Phone: +1 401 863 6818
E-mail: Eric_Darling@brown.edu

Eric Darling's Brown Research URL:
http://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Eric_Darling

On The Web:
Force scanning: quick maps and measurements of living cells
Alternative to Surface Markers Can Be Used to Sort Stem Cells
Physical properties predict stem cell outcome
Beacons light up stem cell transformation
Three win NSF CAREER awards
Darling Lab webpage

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